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Testosterone, Viagra 'not a winning ED combination'

Want to boost your sexual stamina? Just cut out meat, fish, and dairy from your diet.
As you probably know, junky diets typically lead to heart disease. And men often fail to remember that heart disease doesn’t just affect your ticker—it impacts the blood flow to other areas of the body too, says Lindsay Rajt, Associate Director of Campaigns for PETA. But if you’re eating the right foods, you can avoid that plaque from building up in your arteries, Rajt says.
That doesn’t mean you have to go fully vegan to perform like a pro, especially since plenty of well-designed studies have cleared saturated fat’s connection to heart disease. (Don’t believe us? Here’s Why “Bad” Fat Is Actually Good for You.) But you can absolutely learn a few things from vegans when it comes to nutrition, like making sure your daily diet always consists of sex-savvy foods—starting with these.


Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/11/19/sex-secret-vegans-know/#ixzz2CozQMUaJ
NEW YORK - Using a testosterone gel in addition to Viagra does not make the little blue pill work any better, according to a new study. viagra

The report's lead researcher said testosterone is typically prescribed to men who have both low testosterone levels and symptoms such as little interest in sex or low bone and muscle mass.

But "there's a tremendous amount of clinical judgment" that goes into that, said Dr Matthew Spitzer from the Boston University School of Medicine. 

"People are certainly being prescribed and using these medications at increasing amounts."

According to Dr Spitzer, studies have suggested that about one-quarter to one-third of men with erectile dysfunction, or ED, also have low testosterone. 

There is a range in part because doctors and researchers do not all agree on where the cutoff should be for low levels of the male sex hormone.

Dr Spitzer and his colleagues found that a starting course of sildenafil citrate, marketed as Viagra, helped improve sexual functioning for men with both conditions. 

But adding testosterone on top of that did not provide any added sexual benefits.

The study included 140 men, aged 40 to 70. All were prescribed Viagra at 50mg or 100mg, which they took as needed before sex.

After three to seven weeks, half of the men were randomly assigned to also use a daily testosterone gel, Testim, and the other half used a drug-free placebo gel.

During the Viagra-only portion of the study, men's erectile function scores improved. On the sexual functioning scale, a score of 11 to 16 is considered "moderate" erectile dysfunction and 17 to 21 is "mild to moderate" dysfunction. 

The highest possible score, signalling no erectile problems, is 30. 

On average, men's scores increased from 12.1 to 19.8 with Viagra.

The men's testosterone levels also rose on Viagra, according to the findings published yesterday in the Annals of Internal Medicine.

For men who were then given the testosterone gel, testosterone levels increased significantly again. But neither those men nor the ones who used the placebo gel had any further change in their erectile function over the next three months.

There was also no difference between the two groups on measures of sexual desire, orgasm and frequency of intercourse.

Dr Spitzer said that his team did not look at the effects of testosterone without Viagra and it is possible the gel would boost sexual functioning compared to no treatment.

In addition, testosterone may have other beneficial health effects, such as on strength and body composition, he pointed out.

"It doesn't mean that if the individual has either symptoms of androgen deficiency or hypogonadism (low hormone production from the testes), that those wouldn't get better with testosterone," said Dr Alvin Matsumoto, a geriatrician from the University of Washington School of Medicine, who was not involved in the new study.

In addition, he said, "what you don't know is, if you don't respond significantly to sildenafil and you have low testosterone, whether testosterone wouldn't help in addition".

Not all men see improvement with Viagra-type drugs, he said.

"Androgen deficiencies are complex situations. Individuals always need to talk with their doctor about their own medical problems and figure out what is the best therapy for their set of individual problems," Dr Spitzer said.

The new study, he said, "doesn't inform us about how to treat one patient". REUTERS
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